January 12, 2010

Starbucks Gives Soul & Spirit Unexpected Jolt

Have you ever purchased something other than coffee from Starbucks? (And I'm not talking about a Cinnamon Dolce Latte or a Triple Venti Soy White Mocha.)

I'm talking about a travel mug, a French press, or a coffee grinder. Have you ever carried something like that up to the counter? Maybe?

What about a Starbucks CD? Probably not, but not out of the realm of possibility, huh?

What about a book? (Yes...I said book.) Nope?

Me neither.

I guess I've seen them there from time to time – stacked between the gift cards and the tip jar – but I paid as much attention to them as a "Bearista Bear." (Which DOES exist as well.)

When I was given a "Starbucks book" and encouraged to read it – I simply cringed. (It was like some poured the before-mentioned Cinnamon Dolce Latte on my crotch – extra hot, room for cream.)

When I had nothing better to do, I picked it up and started to thumb through it. For the first time, I actually read the title – "One: How Many People Does it Take to Make a Difference" – I was intrigued.

This little book is...

AWESOME!

It is a wonderfully great collection of quotes and stories that has a simple call to action: Change the World. I wanted to share one of the thoughts that really stood out in this inspiring publication "created exclusively for Starbucks Coffee Company."

There's a silent killer that stalks America. It's call "rustout" and it's far more deadly and scary than burnout. Sure, burnout can wear down your body, but rustout can wipe out your soul and your spirit.

"Rustout is the slow death that follows when we stop making the choices that keep life alive. It's the feeling of numbness that comes from always taking the safe way, never accepting new challenges, continually surrendering to the day-to-day routine. Rustout means we are no longer growing, but at best, are simply maintaining. It implies that we have traded the sensation of life for the security of a paycheck...Rustout is the opposite of burnout. Burnout is overdoing. Rustout is underbeing."

– Richard Leider & Steve Buchoz, The Rustout Syndrome

NOTE: After further research, this "Starbucks publication" was simply an excerpt from a broader book with the same name. It was written by Dan Zadra & Kobi Yamada. (Click here for more info)


1 comment:

Dave said...

Nice post Drew. I would never have found this on my own. Thanks for sharing.

Want Blog Updates?
E-mail Address: